cytokeratin-7

Rare perianal extramammary Paget disease successfully treated using topical Imiquimod therapy

Background: Perianal Paget’s disease (PPD) is a rare intraepithelial adenocarcinoma of the anal margin. Primary PPD likely represents intra-epithelial neoplasm from an apocrine source, whereas secondary disease may represent“pagetoid” spread from an anorectal malignancy.

Case presentation: Histologic CDX-2 and CK20 are hallmark markers for colorectal-derived Paget’s cells. Interestingly, our primary PPD patient presented both positive and no internal malignancy was identified. In addition, a negative CK7 marker was observed in our case in contrast with previously reported. Surgical excision is the standard treatment; however, previous studies have demonstrated good response with Imiquimod 5% cream in patients with vulval extramammary Paget disease (EMPD). The efficiency of Imiquimod treatment for PPD has not been well described. Our PPD patient was successfully treated using Imiquimod 5% cream.

Conclusions: This study describes a primary cutaneous PPD patient CDX-2+/CK20+/CK7- without invasion of the dermis and no associated colorectal carcinoma effectively treated using topical Imiquimod therapy, suggesting that Imiquimod might potentially be considered as a first-line treatment for PPD.

Multicentric Primary Extramammary Paget Disease: A Toker Cell Disorder?

Toker cells are epithelial clear cells found in the areolar and nipple areas of the breast, vulvar region, and other apocrine gland–bearing areas of the skin. Toker cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of clear cell papulosis, cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells, and rare cases of primary extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) but not in secondary EMPD with underlying adenocarcinoma. The pathogenesis of primary EMPD is not well defined. We report a case of multicentric primary EMPD with evidence of Toker cell proliferation and nonaggressive biologic behavior in a 63-year-old white man. A detailed description of the morphologic and biologic features of Toker cells and their possible carcinogenetic links also are discussed. Based on the observation and follow-up of our patient, we hypothesize that multicentric primary EMPD starts with Toker cell hyperplasia and can potentially evolve to carcinoma in the genital region.

Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), which was first described by Crocker1 in a patient with erythematous patches on the penis and scrotum, is morphologically identical to mammary Paget disease (MPD) of the nipple. The principal difference between EMPD and MPD is anatomic location.