EMPD Clinical Presentations and Reference Materials  

The following EMPD clinical presentations and reference materials will give you a better understanding of extramammary Paget disease (EMPD).

 
 
 Medscape

Medscape

Extramammary Paget Disease Clinical Presentation

The possibility of extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) should be carefully considered in any patient with chronic dermatitis of the groin, vulva, or perianal area. Patients with EMPD usually present with nonresolving eczematous lesions in the groin, genitalia, perineum, or perianal area. [4] The most common symptom of EMPD is intense pruritus; most patients have only pruritus in the affected area and no other symptoms. Pain and bleeding may occur in longer-standing lesions.

 
 J Lloyd, AM Flanagan

J Lloyd, AM Flanagan

Mammary and extramammary Paget’s disease 

Abstract
Mammary and extramammary Paget’s disease are uncommon intraepithelial ad- enocarcinomas. Both conditions have similar clinical features, which mimic inflammatory and infective diseases. His- tological diagnostic confusion can arise between Paget’s disease and other neo- plastic conditions aVecting the skin, with the most common diVerential diagnoses being malignant melanoma and atypical squamous disease. The glandular diVer- entiation of both mammary Paget’s dis- ease and extramammary Paget’s disease is indicated by morphological appear- ances, the presence of intracellular mucin in many cases, and positive immunohisto- chemical staining for glandular cytokerat- ins, epithelial membrane antigen, and carcinoembryonic antigen. 

 

 
 The British Skin Foundation 

The British Skin Foundation 

Extra-mammary Paget’s disease

Extra-mammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare, slow-growing disease that is usually due to a pre-invasive type of skin cancer. Usually it is confined to the skin, but in approximately 20% of the cases it can be associated with an invasive cancer more deeply. It typically looks similar to a patch of eczema. It usually affects skin in the genital area and around the anus of both males and females. It is commonest in people aged between 50-60 years. It can be primary, when its origin is in the skin, or secondary, when it comes from other adjacent regions internally like urethra, cervix, bladder or bowel. Paget’s disease, in contrast, refers to the same type of changes affecting the breast or nipple. There is no relation to another disease called Paget’s disease of the bone.